Food, food, more food

Two weeks ago we started getting Bryson Farms organic produce baskets delivered to our condo. They deliver all-year ’round, and while we’re just at the beginning of the serious growing season the produce has been fantastic. Leeks, fiddleheads, red potatoes, sweet potatoes, salad greens, microgreens, zucchini, daikon radish (a first for me), shell peas, green beans, kale, chives (they do herbs, too), etc etc.

Naturally the greens go straight into salads, and I’ve been preparing most everything else as simply as possible. Peas and green beans are simply steamed and served with salt, pepper, and a hint of butter. Leeks and potatoes made for an incredible leek + potato soup. Sweet potatoes will be going into a curried sweet potato soup tomorrow. Kale is sauted with a hint of garlic and olive oil. And so on. The quality and quantity is fantastic, and I’m seriously looking forward to tomato season since Bryson is all about crazy heirloom tomato varieties. I’ve also got my fingers crossed for beets and asparagus soon, but we’ll see. The fun part is that it’s a random selection of produce every week — I’ve never had daikon radish or fiddleheads before, so it’s a fun way to try new things.

Tonight’s menu finished off the week’s potatoes and peas:

  • Pan-roasted thick cut lamb chops, simply prepared with fresh rosemary
  • Steamed peas
  • Greek-style pan-fried potato wedges (rosemary, olive oil, salt + pepper, topped with a squeeze of lemon)

The nice part about the Bryson Farms delivery, in addition to it being very high quality produce, is that it’s all certified organic and locally grown, the farm being roughly 50 miles away in Quebec. So — excellent quality, reasonable prices, healthier, fun, and helps reduce our carbon footprint. There’s really no downside at all.

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10 thoughts on “Food, food, more food

  1. I propose a Mountain View vs. Toronto vs. Paris vs. Tokyo vs. Auckland friendly cookoff at our next Mozilla summit. We just need to theme it right. 🙂

  2. I propose a Mountain View vs. Toronto vs. Paris vs. Tokyo vs. Auckland friendly cookoff at our next Mozilla summit. We just need to theme it right. 🙂

  3. We used them for about a year and then discontinued. I lovelovelove the microgreens and salad greens. The fresh herbs were nice, but inconsistent–the herbs sent didn’t always correspond well to the rest of the order. I also got really sick of bok choy at one point–we had so much for a few weeks that we were eating it in large quantities three or four times a week. The rest of the growing season went well, but we discontinued in the fall after building up four pounds of sweet potatoes and a little bit more than four pounds of beets–there’s only so much of those a person can stand to eat in a week. 😉

    I really loved the quality, though, and their herbs are incredible quality–I buy their mint weekly here at the Parkdale Market for an Indian mint chutney I enjoy. You can’t buy mint of better quality in any store. I found that my enjoyment of the weekly ‘surprise’ factor in the basket contents diminished significantly by the end of the growing season, and we opted to buy from them at the market and can or freeze the produce for winter instead. This way we could get what we liked and have less food waste.

    This year we have bought a share in a friend’s CSA. I’m really excited about it!

  4. We used them for about a year and then discontinued. I lovelovelove the microgreens and salad greens. The fresh herbs were nice, but inconsistent–the herbs sent didn't always correspond well to the rest of the order. I also got really sick of bok choy at one point–we had so much for a few weeks that we were eating it in large quantities three or four times a week. The rest of the growing season went well, but we discontinued in the fall after building up four pounds of sweet potatoes and a little bit more than four pounds of beets–there's only so much of those a person can stand to eat in a week. ;)I really loved the quality, though, and their herbs are incredible quality–I buy their mint weekly here at the Parkdale Market for an Indian mint chutney I enjoy. You can't buy mint of better quality in any store. I found that my enjoyment of the weekly 'surprise' factor in the basket contents diminished significantly by the end of the growing season, and we opted to buy from them at the market and can or freeze the produce for winter instead. This way we could get what we liked and have less food waste.This year we have bought a share in a friend's CSA. I'm really excited about it!

  5. Toronto? But everyone knows the Ottawa crew would kick Toronto’s ass… so I’m not sure if I want to let them cookoff for me. That said, if YOW & YYZ combined forces, we’d be fearsome.

    I also think that’s a fantastic idea. Grills at twilight, 20 paces.

  6. Toronto? But everyone knows the Ottawa crew would kick Toronto's ass… so I'm not sure if I want to let them cookoff for me. That said, if YOW & YYZ combined forces, we'd be fearsome.I also think that's a fantastic idea. Grills at twilight, 20 paces.

  7. We did Bryson for over a year but eventually left for various reasons. First off – be careful because it’s actually not all locally grown. Especially during the winter when they import just about everything (cept maybe the micro greens). I recall getting something-or-other from South America and stuff even from Turkey if I recall correctly. And another word of caution – be careful what you wish for (beets) – they’ll come and you’ll get beets, and beets, and beets and more beets! We just didn’t know what to do with beets anymore – and in fact still have several jars of beet soup on the basement.

    The main reason we left is that the “crazy heirloom” just got a bit too crazy for us. We just didn’t know what we were getting (they don’t really tell you – or didn’t at the time). And we didn’t know what to do with it. But the upside over other CSAs is that it’s year-round (most are 20 weeks or so) and that you can go week-by-week so opt out any time you like. And back in again. But you pay for that luxury and for the home delivery – they are a good 50% more expensive than other CSAs (that’s the other big reason we left)

    This year we signed up for http://www.saffirefarms.ca/, which is owned and run by a good friend of mine. He’s been farming for decades but this is his first crack at the CSA thing. It’s not heirloom (which we didn’t want), but he said that over the 20 weeks there will be about 60 varieties of “regular” veggies. We’re looking forward to it.

    Anyway, it’s great to see such a variety in CSAs. We should all be supporting local farmers as much as we can, and having different types that cater to different needs means there is something there for everyone.

  8. We did Bryson for over a year but eventually left for various reasons. First off – be careful because it's actually not all locally grown. Especially during the winter when they import just about everything (cept maybe the micro greens). I recall getting something-or-other from South America and stuff even from Turkey if I recall correctly. And another word of caution – be careful what you wish for (beets) – they'll come and you'll get beets, and beets, and beets and more beets! We just didn't know what to do with beets anymore – and in fact still have several jars of beet soup on the basement. The main reason we left is that the “crazy heirloom” just got a bit too crazy for us. We just didn't know what we were getting (they don't really tell you – or didn't at the time). And we didn't know what to do with it. But the upside over other CSAs is that it's year-round (most are 20 weeks or so) and that you can go week-by-week so opt out any time you like. And back in again. But you pay for that luxury and for the home delivery – they are a good 50% more expensive than other CSAs (that's the other big reason we left)This year we signed up for http://www.saffirefarms.ca/, which is owned and run by a good friend of mine. He's been farming for decades but this is his first crack at the CSA thing. It's not heirloom (which we didn't want), but he said that over the 20 weeks there will be about 60 varieties of “regular” veggies. We're looking forward to it.Anyway, it's great to see such a variety in CSAs. We should all be supporting local farmers as much as we can, and having different types that cater to different needs means there is something there for everyone.

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