Embracing failure

[I]ntelligent failures — those that happen early and inexpensively and that contribute new insights about your customers — should be more than just tolerable. They should be encouraged. “Figuring out how to master this process of failing fast and failing cheap and fumbling toward success is probably the most important thing companies have to get good at…

This article is an interesting read.

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2 thoughts on “Embracing failure

  1. To reject failure is to reject 14 billion years of the development of the universe, and to go against the way of nature. Nature is continually refining itself in a relentless cycle ever approaching perfection but never quite getting there. It’s the process more commonly known as evolution. Without the failure of the species who didn’t make it, there would have been nothing learned by the ones who did.

    I liked this quote from the article : “Figuring out how to master this process of failing fast and failing cheap and fumbling toward success is probably the most important thing companies have to get good at”. It really reminded me of “taking ukemi” in Aikido. In Aikido there is the attacker – or Uke. And defender – or Nage. Uke attacks, and Nage performs a technique on Uke, who ultimately gets thrown (or pinned) if Nage performs the technique successfully. From one point of view that may be considered failure on Uke’s part. However, it is of vital importance that one learn the art of being thrown – or Ukemi. Without it you body can be seriously damaged. Without it, Nage cannot learn to throw someone – cannot perfect the technique. Any Aikido instructor will tell you in no uncertain terms that Uke and Nage perform equally important roles on the mat. And it is of utmost importance to learn both roles equally well.

    Perhaps the corporate view of failure is finally coming in line with the laws of nature. That’s a good thing, because you cannot go against the laws of nature indefinitely.

  2. To reject failure is to reject 14 billion years of the development of the universe, and to go against the way of nature. Nature is continually refining itself in a relentless cycle ever approaching perfection but never quite getting there. It’s the process more commonly known as evolution. Without the failure of the species who didn’t make it, there would have been nothing learned by the ones who did.I liked this quote from the article : “Figuring out how to master this process of failing fast and failing cheap and fumbling toward success is probably the most important thing companies have to get good at”. It really reminded me of “taking ukemi” in Aikido. In Aikido there is the attacker – or Uke. And defender – or Nage. Uke attacks, and Nage performs a technique on Uke, who ultimately gets thrown (or pinned) if Nage performs the technique successfully. From one point of view that may be considered failure on Uke’s part. However, it is of vital importance that one learn the art of being thrown – or Ukemi. Without it you body can be seriously damaged. Without it, Nage cannot learn to throw someone – cannot perfect the technique. Any Aikido instructor will tell you in no uncertain terms that Uke and Nage perform equally important roles on the mat. And it is of utmost importance to learn both roles equally well.Perhaps the corporate view of failure is finally coming in line with the laws of nature. That’s a good thing, because you cannot go against the laws of nature indefinitely.

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