Chicken Stock Results

Ok, so, making a basic chicken stock is as easy as falling down. Seriously. I aced this first try, with the resulting stock being a beautiful not-fatty, not-salty, golden amber liquid that tastes quite simply of chicken. It’s really good.

I took some pictures.

Image 1: Chicken bits, post-sweat. Tons of juice was drawn out of the chicken during the sweating stage, which I guess is the point.

Image 2: Post-sweat, pre-simmer. I had just added the boiling water and bay leaves and given it a stir.

Image 3: Post-simmer. After an hour or so of a very slow simmer, the fat had all floated to the top and the broth was clearer, deeper colour.

I failed to take any photos of the straining/restraining/cooling/defatting stage. The defatting process was easy, but wasn’t so much “peeling” the fat layer off the top, but more a “scraping the fatty goop off the top”. It was super easy and took about 5 mins with a soup spoon. It did, however, take a full 24 hours for the stock to cool and set well enough to do the defatting. Don’t rush it.

What was under the fat surprised me. As I mentioned yesterday, I’ve never made stock before so I was expecting there to be liquid under the fatty layer. Not so! The stock had set into what can only be described as Chicken Jello. Seriously, it was all gelatinated and wobbly and awesome. Here’s a picture of it, after I’d put it into a pot to warm/melt so I could get it into bags/ice cube trays for freezing:

Image 4: There’s always room for J-E-L-L-O.

And there we have it, my first great stock-making adventure. It went so well (seriously, it’s some damned yummy stock), that I’m already trying my second stock, this one a little more complicated:

Image 5: Pre-simmer stock #2.

This one’s made up of turkey necks/wings and hunks of beef shank (with bone) that I roasted for a couple of hours before putting in the pot. Also included are 2 carrots, 1.5 celery stalks, 1.5 onions, 15 peppercorns, 2 bay leaves, and 10 sprigs of parsley. I’ll be simmering this one for at least three hours, and it already smells incredible. Mmf.

If you’ve never done it, you should seriously try making stock. It’s ridiculously easy.

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6 thoughts on “Chicken Stock Results

  1. Hey, good work! I’ve been making stock for years now. One thing I find that really speeds things up is a pressure cooker. I used to boil for 3 or 4 hours but now get the same job done in about 30 to 45 minutes in a pressure cooker. You just gotta be careful not to go too long with chicken as it can liquify the bones 🙂 When I’m done I also pressure-can it in mason jars instead of freezing it, since we’ve got limited freezer space. It stores well on the shelf for at least 3 years that I’ve had it.

    I also don’t separate the fat until it’s time to use the stock, because for some things you can actually use the fat (e.g. making gravy). After canning it is right on top of the jar (of course), so when you open the jar you can decide whether or not you are going to use the fat. If not, just spoon it out and discard.

    Using a jar of stock is a quick way to make a yummy meal. On saturday I made an awesome Deer and Noodle soup and posted the recipe to my blog

    http://www.bodensatz.com/article.php?story=20060219124803624

    Home made soup in minutes!

  2. Hey, good work! I’ve been making stock for years now. One thing I find that really speeds things up is a pressure cooker. I used to boil for 3 or 4 hours but now get the same job done in about 30 to 45 minutes in a pressure cooker. You just gotta be careful not to go too long with chicken as it can liquify the bones 🙂 When I’m done I also pressure-can it in mason jars instead of freezing it, since we’ve got limited freezer space. It stores well on the shelf for at least 3 years that I’ve had it.I also don’t separate the fat until it’s time to use the stock, because for some things you can actually use the fat (e.g. making gravy). After canning it is right on top of the jar (of course), so when you open the jar you can decide whether or not you are going to use the fat. If not, just spoon it out and discard.Using a jar of stock is a quick way to make a yummy meal. On saturday I made an awesome Deer and Noodle soup and posted the recipe to my bloghttp://www.bodensatz.com/article.php?story=2006…Home made soup in minutes!

  3. We make a fair bit of stock here. Our secret weapon is the freezer. If you have enough freezer space (chest freezer rock for this), simply set aside the bones whenever you buy bone-in meats (or vegetable scraps if you want to do a veggie stock) until you have enough for to make stock.

    Our favorite trick is to make a tasty roast chicken (CI has some great brine-related recipes, I believe) on a Saturday night, and then use the carcass to make a stock on Sunday, yielding soup for the balance of the week.

  4. We make a fair bit of stock here. Our secret weapon is the freezer. If you have enough freezer space (chest freezer rock for this), simply set aside the bones whenever you buy bone-in meats (or vegetable scraps if you want to do a veggie stock) until you have enough for to make stock. Our favorite trick is to make a tasty roast chicken (CI has some great brine-related recipes, I believe) on a Saturday night, and then use the carcass to make a stock on Sunday, yielding soup for the balance of the week.

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